Should I Acknowledge Social Media Compliments?

Narcissistic sure is a weird way to pronounce amazing. (Unknown)

Let’s keep this short, shall we? We’re going to talk social media for a quick minute. Now, for the most part, we know how to acknowledge compliments in real life, right? There are a number of ways to do this, but here are the most common two. Imagine this conversation between Gwen and Ralph:

Situation 1:

Gwen: Hey Ralph! Nice haircut; it really brings out your eyes.
Ralph: Thanks Gwen. I thought I would try something a little different.
Gwen: Cool. Do you–ahh–want to go out sometime?
Ralph: Oh…I appreciate you asking, but I don’t like you in that way…
Gwen: Oh. Kay, bye.

See how Ralph politely acknowledged Gwen’s compliment about his hair? That is one way we receive compliments in everyday conversations.

Situation 2:

Gwen: Hey Ralph! Your shirt is awesome! I, too, love World of Warcraft.
Ralph: Well, it’s an old shirt and I–uh–it was clean so…
Gwen: Well, I like it. 
Ralph: Um, thanks.

 While painfully awkward, this is a common way for people to answer compliments. It’s very self-deprecating and deflecting, but it is something that we do come across when offering up compliments.

Social media compliments are, on the other hand, a different beast. 

The easiest way to get my point across is to use a very common example: profile pictures. I think we can all relate to this. You put up a new profile picture on, say, Facebook and you get a bunch of likes (which you do not have to acknowledge) and a number of nice comments. Here is where the question of whether or not to thank your friends comes up.

My answer is that it depends on the number of comments you receive. Are you Beyonce? Did you get hundreds of compliments? No? Then thank your friends for taking the time to type out a few kind words. If you get a whole bunch of compliments you don’t even have to thank each person, but every three or four people say “thanks everybody” or “you’re all so great, thanks”. Something, anything to tell your friends that you saw their compliments and you appreciate them. That is, after all, why we typically share flattering pictures of ourselves. Let’s not lie about it.

Too often I see profile pictures where there are tons of sweet and thoughtful comments posted and the person whose picture it is does not even acknowledge that they have seen them (which we totally know they have).

Of course this differs depending on if you’re on Instagram or Twitter or Facebook, but I think that saying “thank you” is always the classy thing to do. Put yourself in the shoes of your admirers. Wouldn’t you like your kind words to at least be acknowledged? Otherwise, why say anything?

Stay classy, friends,

Kassieboo

ANSWER YOUR EMAIL!

I’ve  given up email. Well, almost. At the weekend I set up one of those auto-reply  messages, informing my correspondents that I would no longer be checking my  emails, and that instead they might like to call or write, as we used to in the  olden days. (Tom Hodgkinson)

I hope that this title speaks for itself, but just in case it doesn’t: this post is about the most important etiquette involved in emails–ANSWERING THEM!

We’re busy; we have so many accounts and alerts; we’re always plugged in. I understand this. I’m busy, too. I have memorized a plethora of passwords for social media accounts as well as three different email addresses.

email rant pic

This is no excuse for not answering emails from friends, family, and colleagues. You don’t have to answer them right away (although, within 24 hours is polite), but you should at least acknowledge them. Even just quick reply stating you received the email and will take the time to reply when it is convenient. I also know a few people who list the times of day they are likely to reply to emails in their signatures. Any kind of acknowledgement is acceptable.

This seems more like a rant than a real post, but I do think that this is really important for keeping your email relationships healthy. I always wonder if people receive my emails and, after a day, I usually send a follow-up. I’m not trying to be annoying, but I do need a response. At the very least I need to know that my email was received by the right person. I don’t want to bug the people I’m emailing, I don’t, but when I email a teacher or colleague, there is usually an important reason. Otherwise, I would wait and talk to them the next time I see him or her.

My mom always says (I sound like Forest Gump, right?) that you wouldn’t leave your snail mail unopened so why would you leave you email unopened (or unanswered)? The comparison is pretty eye-opening. Email is communication. Communication is not a one-way street. Don’t disrespect your emailers (not a word, I know) by leaving them to communicate by themselves; that’s just rude.

Sorry to be disjointed, but this is a real pet peeve of mine.

As always, I encourage you to comment with your pet peeves–I’ll even blog about it!

Stay classy (and answer your emails),

Kassieboo

Works Cited:

Picture from inchoo.net. (I came across it in a Google search)