ANSWER YOUR EMAIL!

I’ve  given up email. Well, almost. At the weekend I set up one of those auto-reply  messages, informing my correspondents that I would no longer be checking my  emails, and that instead they might like to call or write, as we used to in the  olden days. (Tom Hodgkinson)

I hope that this title speaks for itself, but just in case it doesn’t: this post is about the most important etiquette involved in emails–ANSWERING THEM!

We’re busy; we have so many accounts and alerts; we’re always plugged in. I understand this. I’m busy, too. I have memorized a plethora of passwords for social media accounts as well as three different email addresses.

email rant pic

This is no excuse for not answering emails from friends, family, and colleagues. You don’t have to answer them right away (although, within 24 hours is polite), but you should at least acknowledge them. Even just quick reply stating you received the email and will take the time to reply when it is convenient. I also know a few people who list the times of day they are likely to reply to emails in their signatures. Any kind of acknowledgement is acceptable.

This seems more like a rant than a real post, but I do think that this is really important for keeping your email relationships healthy. I always wonder if people receive my emails and, after a day, I usually send a follow-up. I’m not trying to be annoying, but I do need a response. At the very least I need to know that my email was received by the right person. I don’t want to bug the people I’m emailing, I don’t, but when I email a teacher or colleague, there is usually an important reason. Otherwise, I would wait and talk to them the next time I see him or her.

My mom always says (I sound like Forest Gump, right?) that you wouldn’t leave your snail mail unopened so why would you leave you email unopened (or unanswered)? The comparison is pretty eye-opening. Email is communication. Communication is not a one-way street. Don’t disrespect your emailers (not a word, I know) by leaving them to communicate by themselves; that’s just rude.

Sorry to be disjointed, but this is a real pet peeve of mine.

As always, I encourage you to comment with your pet peeves–I’ll even blog about it!

Stay classy (and answer your emails),

Kassieboo

Works Cited:

Picture from inchoo.net. (I came across it in a Google search)

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“Please”

“Which way did they go, Peeves?” Filch was saying. “Quick, tell me.”
“Say ‘please.'”
“Don’t mess with me, Peeves, now where did they go?”
“Shan’t say nothing if you don’t say please,” said Peeves in his annoying singsong voice.
“All right- PLEASE.”
“NOTHING! Ha haaa! Told you I wouldn’t say nothing if you didn’t say please! Ha ha! Haaaaaa!” And they heard the sound of Peeves whooshing away and Filch cursing in rage.”  (JK Rowling, Harry Potter and The Sorcerer’s Stone)

“Please”

I’d like to keep this short because it should be just a refresher for everybody.

When you ask somebody to do something for you (whether he or she is paid to do that thing or not), you say “please”.

End of story.

That’s all, folks.

Image

But really, this is supposed to be a natural inclination. I was raised to say please when I asked for things or ordered food or needed something done for me. In fact, if I didn’t say it, my family (including my older brothers) would tell me I needed to say “the magic words” or they just wouldn’t do it until I remembered to say please. It wasn’t a matter of only doing this in public. I had to do it at home, too. Saying please, for me, is a natural part of asking a question or ordering foods or services. I’m not suggesting that I’m perfect, but I certainly know that you say please!

I find it incredibly rude when I am out with a few friends who don’t say please and thank you to their servers in restaurants or even the person from whom they are buying pants!

To me, not saying please suggests that it is your right to expect something to be done; that you believe you are better than the person serving you. And that is never true. Every single person is equal, from the Queen of England to your server at McDonalds. And each person deserves the same level of respect. That level of respect includes saying please.

You’ll notice that I didn’t include much about “thank you” in this post, but that is because I reblogged this post by Greg Morton in the last month and I think that he does a good job of explaining its use.

Stay tuned for more!

Stay classy,

Kassieboo

Work Cited

The image is 100% my own (shotty) work.

The Harry Potter quotation was taken from this site because I didn’t think to look for it in my own copy of the novel. The passage belongs to JK Rowling, I am just quoting it.

Something a Little Different

Believe it or not, I don’t just think about manners and etiquette. I think about a lot of different things. I care about a lot of different things.

I have another, newer blog which I use to discuss things that relate to me and my life. It’s not a journal or anything like that. It’s just a space where I talk about things which I hope other people will be able to enjoy and relate to. Recently (in the last 24 hours), I wrote a post for this blog that is about how I have trouble dealing with the world’s ugliness. I don’t know that it is manners- or etiquette-related, but I think that it certainly relates to how humans treat one another.

It’s Overwhelming, At Times

I welcome you to have a little look around this other blog. I feel like there are some common themes between Life is What You Do and Classy and True, probably because I write both of them.

I’ll have another etiquette post for you very soon so stay tuned and stay classy!

Kassieboo

Texting (1)

Texting  is a fundamentally sneaky form of communication, which we should despise, but it  is such a boon we don’t care. We are all sneaks now. (Lynne Truss)

I could write hundreds of posts on all the problems that texting has caused in society, but I’ll narrow it down (for now).

Is there anything worse than planning a nice evening or afternoon at a good restaurant only to spend the entire time sitting across the table from somebody who has his or her nose in a smartphone?

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been out for dinner and looked across the restaurant or bar to see a couple completely ignoring one another as they text. It’s weird! Why spend money and put on pants when you’re just going to sit there and text or play Candy Crush? Not only is it strange to see as an observer, but it is beyond careless to your date or friend. It has gotten so bad that some restaurants have taken it upon themselves to fix this social disgrace. A few different places offer discounts on meals for patrons who choose to leave their smartphones in a secure area away from the tables. This isn’t a bad idea, but the fact that texting is so much of a problem that restaurants are stepping in is ridiculous!

text ecard 1 for classy and true blogIf I were on a date and I’d spent hours primping and making myself look nice, I would feel really crappy if my guy turned out to be one of these super rude, texting fiends! What this kind of behaviour says is me is that my date doesn’t value our time together or is uninterested in what I have to say. That’s probably not the intention of my date, but his texting suggests otherwise.

I think that texting while spending time with someone just comes down to selfishness and not thinking about others. It’s not that texters are trying to be mean or ignore their friends and dates, it’s that they aren’t paying attention. Their needs come first. They’re too plugged-in and so their sense of urgency to reply to seemingly-unimportant contact is heightened because communication is instantaneous.

I’d like to clarify: I’m not saying that you can’t text during dinner or that you can’t answer important messages. I’m just saying that it is also important to respect the people you’re with and your time together.

If you’d like to learn/think more about texting etiquette, check out this link!

Because this is likely the first of a few texting posts, I’ve kept it short.

Stay classy and true,

Kassieboo

 

Works Cited

Image from imgfave.com

Mckee, Maralee. “Seven Ways to Text with Graciousness and Savvy.” Manners Mentor Inc.: You at Your Best., 02 010 2013. Web. <http://www.mannersmentor.com/only-at-work/seven-ways-to-text-with-graciousness-and-savvy&gt;.

 

Doors

Okay! So this is my very first post on Classy and True and I think that it would be best to start out with a very simple topic: Doors.

Imagine this: You’re walking across the parking lot at the grocery store when it suddenly starts to rain violently! You hurry toward the door, tripping slightly as your Toms (or whatever brand name of shoes you’re wearing) get caught on a crack. You don’t fall, but you’re getting wetter and wetter by the minute. On the bright side, you’re about ten steps away from the glorious dryness that is Safeway. You’ve got this. You’re good to go. You’re going to buy some organic almond milk, a bag of bananas, a loaf of gluten-free bread (I guess you’re trying to be healthy or whatever), and-okay, that chocolate bar on special right beside the till-and get the heck out of there. This is your plan. It is a good plan. But then you get to the door and a man checking Facebook on his phone is ahead of you. He pushes the door open for himself and you walk up behind him, assuming that a functioning member of society understands the convention of holding the door for the person behind him, and begin to walk through the door way when BAM!! The plexy glass and steel battering ram called a door slams against your arm and face. The man didn’t hold the door for you. Your entire trip is ruined by poor door etiquette.

When I walk through a door in a public place, I (a) wait to see if somebody else is waiting to walk out and let them go first, (b) hold an arm out behind me just in case anybody is coming through. It would be mean to let the door close on somebody. I feel like these are pretty simple concepts, but apparently they aren’t. I don’t know what it is with people today; maybe we’re in a constant state of late or maybe we’re over stimulated and have too much on our minds. Or maybe we just don’t care about each other. This last point seems to be the answer when a door closes on me or I run to catch the door after someone and they just let it close. I end up thinking to myself, maybe people are just jerks.

I’d like to believe that people aren’t jerks and that they are simply preoccupied with the growing amounts of information with which we are faced every day. This is easier to stomach.

There is also the possibility that maybe parents and society, in general, don’t teach manners anymore. My own parents worked to set a good example for my siblings and me and I’d like to think that I’m a polite and respectful person because of it.

I don’t let doors hit people and I thank those who do the same for me. Ultimately, it comes down to treating others as we want to be treated ourselves. If I don’t hold the door for somebody who has his or her arms full, then maybe somebody won’t hold the door for me when it’s pouring rain and I’ve got a stack of books in my arms.

Maybe that’s the way to inspire door etiquette: think of yourself and what you want and then project that onto your behaviour around other people. While this concept feels selfish, it also makes sense in a world where a lot of doors are opening and closing on a lot of innocent people.

Before I end this surely-stimulating discussion of door etiquette, I guess that it is important to mention an exception for door holding. Don’t hold a door for somebody who is too far away. If they are still halfway across the parking lot or street, then holding the door for them puts the burden on them to hurry up to catch your politeness. That’s crazy. It’s extremely awkward when I’m walking toward a building at school and I look ahead of me (like fifty meters) and somebody is holding the door and looking at me expectantly. I usually end up trotting to catch up and get through the door, but it makes both the holder and the enter-er feel awkward and sometimes annoyed. Not cool.

So next time you are on your phone watching Vine videos of cats as you walk through a doorway, take a glance over your shoulder and check to see if someone is behind you because it sucks to be hit in the face with a closing door.

Thanks for reading. I’ll be back soon!

Kassieboo