Should I Acknowledge Social Media Compliments?

Narcissistic sure is a weird way to pronounce amazing. (Unknown)

Let’s keep this short, shall we? We’re going to talk social media for a quick minute. Now, for the most part, we know how to acknowledge compliments in real life, right? There are a number of ways to do this, but here are the most common two. Imagine this conversation between Gwen and Ralph:

Situation 1:

Gwen: Hey Ralph! Nice haircut; it really brings out your eyes.
Ralph: Thanks Gwen. I thought I would try something a little different.
Gwen: Cool. Do you–ahh–want to go out sometime?
Ralph: Oh…I appreciate you asking, but I don’t like you in that way…
Gwen: Oh. Kay, bye.

See how Ralph politely acknowledged Gwen’s compliment about his hair? That is one way we receive compliments in everyday conversations.

Situation 2:

Gwen: Hey Ralph! Your shirt is awesome! I, too, love World of Warcraft.
Ralph: Well, it’s an old shirt and I–uh–it was clean so…
Gwen: Well, I like it. 
Ralph: Um, thanks.

 While painfully awkward, this is a common way for people to answer compliments. It’s very self-deprecating and deflecting, but it is something that we do come across when offering up compliments.

Social media compliments are, on the other hand, a different beast. 

The easiest way to get my point across is to use a very common example: profile pictures. I think we can all relate to this. You put up a new profile picture on, say, Facebook and you get a bunch of likes (which you do not have to acknowledge) and a number of nice comments. Here is where the question of whether or not to thank your friends comes up.

My answer is that it depends on the number of comments you receive. Are you Beyonce? Did you get hundreds of compliments? No? Then thank your friends for taking the time to type out a few kind words. If you get a whole bunch of compliments you don’t even have to thank each person, but every three or four people say “thanks everybody” or “you’re all so great, thanks”. Something, anything to tell your friends that you saw their compliments and you appreciate them. That is, after all, why we typically share flattering pictures of ourselves. Let’s not lie about it.

Too often I see profile pictures where there are tons of sweet and thoughtful comments posted and the person whose picture it is does not even acknowledge that they have seen them (which we totally know they have).

Of course this differs depending on if you’re on Instagram or Twitter or Facebook, but I think that saying “thank you” is always the classy thing to do. Put yourself in the shoes of your admirers. Wouldn’t you like your kind words to at least be acknowledged? Otherwise, why say anything?

Stay classy, friends,

Kassieboo

Facebook Faux Pas

If you can’t stop thinking about someone’s update, that’s called ‘status cling’. (Jessica Park)

I would like to start by apologizing for going months without updating this blog at all! The class for which I was writing this blog ended so it moved down my list of priorities. That was quite unclassy of me. I will endeavor to do better.

Okay, moving on. From now on, I’m going to work on posting more. How? Well, I’ll be doing much shorter posts. Hopefully, these will be good quality and will happen more often. I ask that you are patient with me while I get into the swing of things.

Enough discussion! Let’s talk about a few Facebook Faux pas. I’ve compiled a list of the 5 least-classy/rude things I have seen my “friends” do on the popular social media site.

5. Not acknowledging compliments on pictures.
Here’s the thing, we’re all busy. We go on the computer to check email, do work, update social media, etc.. These tasks are in addition to the rest of our lives. So when someone takes the time to compliment someone’s picture, be it profile or otherwise, it means that that person took time from his or her busy life to say a nice thing. Is it really so hard to say “thanks”? I don’t think so. Even if that thank you applies to more than one compliment on a picture, it still acknowledges that the kind comments were read and appreciated.

4. Cryptic status updates.
These mysterious messages are both self-indulgent and attention-seeking. Statuses like “I am so done with this” are just annoying. Either the writer has an issue and doesn’t want to share it (in which case he or she shouldn’t make it a status) or has a minor issue and wants to be asked about it and fawned over. When writing these silly statuses, the intention is to force readers to be curious and ask about it. It’s like me wanting to pretend I want privacy, but giving you hundreds of ways to know about me and my life.

3. Knowingly posting offensive/controversial statuses or comments.
We get it. You have controversial opinions. You’re so urban and politically interesting. You enjoy heated political debates and morality discussions that use buzzwords that no layperson could hope to be able to grapple with. I, too, enjoy healthy debates that open up my mind and the minds of others to new perspectives and ideas. I have to ask, though, is Facebook the place for these discussions? I don’t think so. Facebook is supposed to be a way to network and connect with friends, new and old. I don’t know that it is the best forum for debates and discussions that are best suited to round tables or respectfully-moderated areas of discourse. When overly-controversial posts appear on Facebook, it just looks like the poster is trying to insite arguments and anger.

2. Posting pictures or videos that should be accompanied with a warning.
We all have friends who do this. They post pictures of gruesomely-abused animals, huge spiders, post-op knee surgery pics, etc.. Now I’m not saying that these things don’t belong on Facebook. I’m not saying that at all. I’m just saying that I would appreciate posters having the courtesy to include a warning about the content or just posting a link to the content (with a warning). If I’m eating and see swollen and bloody stitched skin after my friend’s knee surgery, I might throw up on my keyboard. If I just lost my dog of fifteen years and am scrolling through my newsfeed, I might be extremely upset to see a viral video of a dog being thrown off a building (true story). This just comes down to respecting your Facebook friends and being aware of what is being shared and posted.

1. Posting passive-aggressive statuses.
These are so obvious. “I never thought that my friend could finish my Toblerone bar without even asking. Friendship terminated. You know who you are.” These are the most annoying posts on Facebook. Instead of dealing with their issues in the non-digital world, there are those Facebook users who chose to write statuses about their anger which they clearly want their offender to read. Come on! This isn’t Gossip Girl! Let’s deal with our problems directly instead of these immature posts. Don’t make your Facebook friends watch as you and your now-enemy post thinly-veiled statuses/insults about one another all over the newsfeed!

In general, these 5 faux pas come down to common courtesy and respecting your social media contacts and their time.

Thanks for reading and, as usual, feel free to comment below with your Facebook faux pas or pet peeves!

Stay classy,
Kassieboo

Essay 2

Essay 2:

Online Publishing: Becoming a Blogger

            Ali Luke states that there are 7 types of bloggers: the “Niche Expert”, the “Business Owner”, the “Professional Blogger”, the “Journal Writer”, the “Platform Builder”, the “Product Promotor”, and the “Freelancer” (2013). Among these categories, every potential publisher, be him or her a blogger or a social media participant or a commenter, can find a place in cyberspace to share information and opinions and interact with other users. A blogger, specifically, either starts out rooted in one of these categories or eventually gets there through the quality and type of content he or she is producing, the creation of an audience, and tracking and analytics.

Starting Out

Creating Readable Content

            “Blogging is publishing, it is content” (Bullas, 2010). Like with any sort of publishable writing, the first thing a blogger must do is decide on the type of content to publish. There are hundreds of genres of writing from mainstream popular veins like health and fitness to more cult-like and lesser known subjects like conspiracy theories and living off the grid. With a purpose for blogging (like one of the seven mentioned above), the first step for any blogger or online publisher is to elect where he or she fits into that spectrum. Factors which influence this decision include the writer’s knowledge of the content and ability to communicate that knowledge, and the planned audience.

            Really, it would seem to most people that a blogger/publisher’s knowledge of the category in which he or she is writing would be the most important aspect of blogging. The writer can be free to share knowledge and understanding of a given topic regardless of his or her non-cyber self’s position in life:

Everyone – regardless of status, wealth, race, gender, etc. – starts off on a level playing field [on the internet]. Although one’s status in the outside world ultimately may have some impact on one’s powers in cyberspace, what mostly determines your influence on others is your skill in communicating (including writing skills), your persistence, the quality of your ideas, and your technical know-how. (Suler, 2002)

In the above quotation, John Suler states that everyone online is equal regardless of his or her non-cyber background. It is the aptitude for communicating one’s knowledge for which one is judged. While different bloggers may have diverse opinions on their subject areas, it is their writing that ultimately keeps or rejects their readers. Scrolling down the “Home” page of Classy and True, for example, a visitor can probably decide within minutes whether or not he or she agrees with the author’s prescriptive views of etiquette and sees any quality in the writing. The traffic for this site, then, may rise through many views, but if the writing is uninteresting or pedantic, then the audience (like the 27 followers of Classy and True) does not grow.

Finding an Audience

The audience, though, is the goal in much of internet publishing. While many sites encourage comments and discussions to improve the audience’s experience, there are many which fall into publishing outrageous or offensive material to drive traffic. This is another decision a blogger/publisher needs to make: is the goal to inspire readers to stay and become an audience, or to draw in new readers daily without caring if they stay? There are sites which choose the latter and do so through well-used Search Engine Optimization techniques (S.E.O.s), but which do not worry about the quality or consistency of posts and writing. These sites use the right tags, “[o]ptimize images–use keywords in the title and the alt tag of the images [they’re] including”, and focus on producing material which ties in with current events and trends (Cognito Media, 2013). While these techniques certainly drive traffic to the site and give it a higher ranking in its community, they do not create any kind of a stable, loyal audience. A blogger must make the decision: high traffic or an acknowledged reader base. There are many sites that have both, but this may not be initially attainable for the new blogger.

            All of these introductory decisions for bloggers come down to understanding the aim of the blog. Blogs, for some, are internet diaries where they can share the ups and downs of their lives and ask for support or help. For others, blogs are all about self-promotion: the fashion designer can display his creations; the musician can expose her new E.P.; and the fantasy writer can practice her trade through Harry Potter fan fiction. Knowing for which one is writing allows one to choose how to present one’s self and what steps to take to invite readers to stay and join the audience. Understanding audience and what the blogger wants to tell the audience helps the blogger to frame posts, schedules for posting, selection of content, and so on.

Analytics and Tracking

            With this discussion of audience, a question arises in the minds of potential bloggers: How does one know who is one’s audience? Prior to starting a blog or website, this is a seemingly very complex question. Those who are less tech-savvy struggle to comprehend how a blogger can target and gain the audience he or she wants. Two things a class like Publishing 101 may teach students about blogging are the helpfulness of an analytics application and the importance of personal tracking.

Analytics

Wordpress Post Stats

A selection from “Top Posts for 90 days ending 2013-11-24 (Summarized)” by WordPress

            Analytics, be them Google Analytics or WordPress Statistics, offer site administrators (in this case, bloggers) the opportunity to track and understand where their traffic is coming from and how that traffic interacts with the blog. Classy and True, for example, is a WordPress.com blog and so uses the WordPress Statistics as analytics to learn more about visitors. The ability to see which posts are most popular tells the blogger to what her audience is more receptive.

            The above chart leads the blogger to the realization that shorter, more humorous, posts, like “Remix Assignment” are more popular and that varied media help to drive more readers to visit.  The most difficult part about WordPress Statistics, however, is that it does not show which posts were being read on the “Home page/ Archives” page of the blog. This skews the numbers because visits to the home page are in the upper 300s while the views of specific posts are still in double-digit numbers.

            The blogger of Classy and True can also see which sites are the best for referring readers to the blog:

[T]he social sites that arrived in the 2000s did not create the social web, but they did structure it. This is really, really significant. In large part, they made sharing on the Internet an act of publishing (!), with all the attendant changes that come with that switch. Publishing social interactions makes them more visible, searchable, and adds a lot of metadata to your simple link or photo post. (Madrigal, 2012)

As Alex Madrigal states in the above quotation, sharing itself has become a form of publishing, just as permanent as the original blog post. For this reason, sharing fresh posts through Facebook and Twitter extend the synapses of the original post, much like the human brain forms new and lasting connections through learning and maturing. The links become part of the permanence of the publication and connect it to dozens of other places on the vast internet. Analytics tell the blogger about each referrer website (usually social media) and helps the blogger build a network of connections and pingbacks to draw a larger potential audience. If Facebook is the top referrer, then the blogger knows that Facebook is the best way to share new and important posts.

            While North America is not considered the number one sharer of posts, it is clear that many countries are full of users who share most of what they come across online:

Sharing KPCB

“Internet Trends” Slide 27 from D11 Conference (Meeker, M. & Wu, L., 2013)

            If an average of twenty-four percent of users across the world regularly share content they come across online, then it is clear why statistics about referrers are important to any blogger’s knowledge of his or her blog. If one reader enjoys a particular post and shares it with like-minded friends and networks, that is a simple way to help an audience expand.

Tracking

            The actions of the blog’s readers are not the only thing that can be tracked and analysed, however. Various websites and applications, such as MercuryApp, offer users the opportunity to track one or more aspects of their daily lives in order to learn about and change possibly negative behaviors. A simple example would be the quality of one’s day and how it is affected by the actions of others:

Emotional Tracking Pub 101

MercuryApp Tracking Graph from 10/25/13-11/21/2013

           The above graph is an example of how the writer of Classy and True tracked the quality of her day, negative comments she heard or overheard, and unusually rude actions which took place. This graph fits into Classy and True‘s theme of etiquette and treating others well so it is an effective way for the blogger to track her own behavior and connect it to her blog. Essentially, this type of tracking gives the blogger substantial evidence to make his or her claims. It can also help the blogger to modify behaviors which make him or her less knowledgeable or genuine about the blog’s subject.

In Closing

        There is so much involved in creating and running a useful and successful blog. A good idea is not enough. Blogging is a multi-facetted process beginning with interesting content and an intended audience. The blogging process does not end with a beautifully-themed website full of witty observations and opinions. Bloggers, like publishers, must analyze audience/reader participation in the blog and adapt as needed to new demands and changes in audience interest. The blogger, especially one writing about personal or common experiences and ideas, must also track and analyze his or her own behavior in order to gain an understanding of who he or she is.  A blogger may be lucky to find a secure position in the fast-changing environment of cyberspace, but the most important tool any online publisher can have is the ability to change and adapt already-strong content for the needs of the audience/readers as analyzed by analytics and tracking.

Reference List

Bullas, J. (2010, October 25). “Is Blogging the Future of Publishing?”.

Cognito Media. (2013, September 05). “10 SEO Tips for 2013”. Forbes (online).

Luke, A. (2013). “The 7 Types of Blogger: Which One Are You?”. 

Madrigal, A. (2012, October 12). Dark social: We have the whole history of the web wrong. The Atlantic.

Meeker, M., & Wu, L. (2013, May). “Internet trends”. Slide Deck from D11 Conference

Suler, J. (2002). The psychology of cyberspace. (2002 ed.). Doylestown, Pen.: True Center Publishing.  (Older version of article published in 1996).

Wasstrom, K. A. (2013, November 24). “Top Posts for 90 days ending 2013-11-24 (Summarized)” [Web Graphic]. WordPress.

Wasstrom, K. A. (2013, November 24). “Tracking Graph from 10/25/13-11/21/2013” [Web Graphic]. MercuryApp.

Journal 7

He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp posts – for support rather than for illumination. (Andrew Lang)

Background on WordPress.com Blog

In case you don’t know, Classy and True is actually a WordPress.com blog (hosted by WordPress) and so it is a little different than sites which only use WordPress technology for themes and content management. This means that I am more limited in what I can do with my blog–more limited than I realized when I chose WordPress.com. For example, there are no plugins available to me and widgets are quite selective. And because I can’t open up my theme and play around with HTML, I cannot use Google Analytics on my blog. This is a huge problem for me.

It’s not that WordPress.com doesn’t have its own analytics, it’s just that Google’s are so detailed and in-depth. I don’t have the same accuracy. I have researched ways in which some users have found been able to install Google Analytics, but the process is somewhat costly and is quite technical for me (I only just learned how to make my font boldface using HTML).

At this point in the semester I am not going to start another blog. I like the way mine looks and most things tend to work for me. However, in the future, the lack of choice in analytics would likely sway my decision when choosing a host for my sites.

My Own Analytics

Okay, enough complaining about something I can’t change at the moment. I’ve spent a little time looking over my WordPress.com analytics:

Blog Stats Visitor Bar Graph

 

So the above chart is a (blurry) example of what I look at each day. This shows the number of visitors that day, all time, and my best ever. It’s pretty helpful to be able to see my months at a glance; it’s even more helpful to look at them by day, but that I don’t get an overall picture.

Clearly, October was a good month for my blog. This is true for a number of reasons:

  • my blog was completely up-and-running
  • I posted more in October than in September
  • I incorporated my social media presence (mostly) into my blog

I also see some things in this chart that give me aspects to work on in my future blog posts:

  • increase comments
  • increase views from each visitor–keep them interested

I’m not sure how I’m going to do these things yet so I’ll have to research this a little more. I think it will just come down to working on how I present my content.

Another tool that I am finding beneficial is the ability to look at where some of my visitors are coming from:

Blog Stats Referrers List

This is a picture of my Referrers Summary for the last quarter (90 days). I think that this is a great place to start finding ways to increase my traffic. Obviously, posiel.com and its various pages are referring me a lot because of its RSS feed and the fact that this blog was designed as an assignment for that website’s Publishing course. To me, this shows how helpful it is to be included in RSS feeds.

Facebook and Twitter are bringing in some traffic, but I’d like to see more from these places. With Twitter, I may need to work on increasing the number of followers who would be interested in the subject matter of my blog. Also, my personal blog, Life is What You Do, is bringing in some traffic for which I am thankful. Being included in more than one blog seems to be another way in which I can increase visits and traffic. I will work on commenting on other blogs and try to make a few friends with similar interests in the blogging community. I know that they’re out there; I just have to connect with them.

Finally, I wanted to include the statistics for my posts:

Blog Stats Top Posts Numbers

I like this chart because it gives me a fairly good idea of the most popular types of content on my site. The only problem is that the majority of my views are attributed to my “Home page/Archives” which is where my new posts show up (as well as in their own categories). This is a little frustrating because I can’t view exactly which posts are the most views. However, the views of each post are somewhat helpful. I know, for example that my essay had a higher viewership so I can assume that it was something that people are interested in. Also, by the number of views of my “A Little About This Website” page, I can tell that it is important to have engaging copy on this type of page because a lot of people look at it. This makes sense.

Closing Thoughts

So with all of this information in mind, I am going to continue to work on my blog. It might be difficult to work with all of my goals at once, but this is a learning process for me so I’ll try to be patient.

Even though I don’t have the ability to work with Google Analytics at this time, I still have some information about how my blog is being viewed and about which things I should work to improve. Ideally, focusing on some of these things will increase my traffic as well as visitors who choose to subscribe to my posts. Really, I just want my writing to be read and (hopefully) enjoyed by as many people as possible.

Thanks for reading,

Kathryn

 

Journal 6

We keep moving forward, opening new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths. (Walt Disney)

Trying Some New Things

Over the last two weeks or so, I’ve been trying some new types of things with my blog and I think that they are a success. I think that by doing them continuously that there will be an increase to my blog’s traffic as well as more readers who choose to follow.

Linking to Social Media

While I’ve had my Twitter account attached to my blog for a few weeks now, it hasn’t really made a difference in blog traffic. I think this is because I don’t use my Twitter as religiously as some people and my followers are mostly friends from high school and the like–they are not necessarily the people who will be most interested in manners and etiquette.

This past week, I tried putting a link to this blog in my Facebook status and saw a small increase in followers and visits. This is great! And I think it will be even greater when I link to larger and more interesting post. Part of this experiment was working up the courage to share my personal (non-academic) writing with my friends and family. Even though I’m an English major and do A LOT of writing, it is still hard to allow people whose opinions matter to me to read my writing. I do think that it will benefit both me and my blog to do this more often, though. For personal blogs, social media seems to be a very good way to advertise.

Including a Larger Variety of Media

Over the past week, I have tried playing around with the types of posts that I include in my blog. Previously, I focused mostly on writing funny, smart posts with lots of information. After reading a few critiques of my classmates’ blogs, however, I have found that many bloggers and readers prefer a mix of media where possible so as to break up large chunks of content. Personally, I don’t mind reading a large block of text as long as the writing is high-quality, but, at this point, I also need to value the ability to drive a lot of traffic to my blog. If pictures and videos help, then I will try to include these popular media.

I included a comic from The Oatmeal as well as a video called “The Science of Happiness” to which I was referred by a friend. My hits didn’t rise much from these posts, but I think that I should still work with these ideas. I plan to focus on learning how to incorporate more media smoothly and with a point rather than for the sake of including videos and pictures.

Adding More Tags to Each Post

This is really a “no-brainer”. The more tags a post has, the higher chance of it being found by people using search engines. I’ve been trying to use tags that refer to specific sections of my post as well as general ideas and themes.

I tried tagging more on posts in my new personal blog, Life is What You Doand saw higher traffic per post. I then tried this with Classy and True and saw the same thing so it is clearly a useful method of bringing in more and more traffic. The next step is to work on ways to keep those readers interested and coming back.

Linking Back and Forth to Another Blog

I also tried linking this blog to my personal one and vice versa. I did this with the idea that if a reader liked one, the he or she would hopefully like the other, too. Also, I usually do posts for both blogs in one sitting so it is very easy to include links back and forth. This is probably why my posts on each blog tend to relate to one another–I’m writing with a specific idea in mind.

Over the next few weeks, I’m going to try to work on the above things and see how well they work with my blog. I don’t want to become inconsistent in my style so I don’t think that I’ll be doing too many new things for a while.

I’ll keep updating my journal on the progress of my blog.

Thanks,

Kassieboo (Kathryn)

Legalities:

“The Science of Happiness” does not belong to me. It belongs to Soul Pancake. I claim no ownership over any part of its material.

The Oatmeal does not belong to me, either. I just think that it is awesome!

Journal 4

No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another. (Charles Dickens)

Incorporating Parts of Myself

I linked my Twitter account to Classy and True today. It turned out to be a lot more difficult than I would have guessed. I couldn’t make the Twitter Timeline widget work how I wanted it to–it wasn’t displaying a live feed–so I did what any mildly-resourceful person in his or her 20’s-50’s would do in this day and age: I googled it. Luckily, there is a huge community of WordPress.com users who are only too willing to share their knowledge and skills with one another. I quickly found a forum which dealt with exactly my problem. Lots of users were having the same difficulty and lots of users were trying to assist in fixing the problem. Halfway down the page, somebody mentioned that she had fixed her own blog’s problem and, although she thought that her mistake was silly, she shared the way in which she dealt with the problem. As it turns out, we were both making the same mistake and her answer completely fixed my Twitter feed.

Emotional/Philosophical Tangent

This is one of the reasons that I don’t completely hate the internet: yes, there are perverts and weirdos and trolls who roam unsightly URLs  and Facebook discussions looking for their next unsuspecting, Angry Birds-playing victim, but there are also millions of people who are willing and happy to share their vast knowledge for no other reason than because they have that knowledge. While the internet has contributed to many people becoming socially awkward and distracted, it has also become an outlet for lots of people to help others using skills that didn’t even exist 20 years ago. I find this to be kind of beautiful in its own way. This resource with which we have a love-hate relationship has opened up innumerable possibilities for providing others with aid.

Reasoning for Incorporation

I attached my Twitter to Classy and True because it is really the only social media I have which is even remotely appropriate for the blog. I don’t mean that I spend my Facebook time cussing and putting up inappropriate pictures of myself because I don’t. However, I’ve had my Facebook account since I was in grade 9, almost 8 years ago. I don’t really think that my 14-year-old self applies to my vision for my blog. In the future I may choose to create a Facebook page which is only for Classy and True, but with me being in my fourth year of university, I just don’t have the time for that at the moment.

My Twitter account is pretty docile, for the most part. I have always had teachers and parents and family as followers so I’ve never said or tweeted anything that wasn’t appropriate for my mother or English 12 teacher. I feel that it would not be difficult for me to tailor my tweets to fit my vision for this blog. This really doesn’t involve much change as many of my tweets tend to focus on human observation and things like language and manners (okay, they’re sometimes rants).

I’ll spend a little time exploring social media options and see if there are any other parts of myself which I would like to attach to Classy and True, but I do want to keep this blog relatively simple. Maybe I’m old fashioned enough to believe that (hopefully) good writing should speak for itself and gain followers of content rather than purely presentation.

Anyways, have a good week! I’ll be back soon with more journal entries and blog posts.

Kassieboo